greurope7Q & A
Tassos Symeonides
(RIEAS Academic Advisor)

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (www.rieas.gr) Publication date: 27 October 2019

Note: The article reflects the opinion of the author and not necessarily the views of the Research Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS)

It is a common secret that communist “truths” are widely accepted in Greece. For a country that survived the post-WWII Soviet land grab and never came under communist rule this is a rather strange phenomenon, isn’t it?

It is indeed. To understand fully the roots of widespread leftism in Greece we should quickly recap historical events that help explain this proclivity, the most prominent of which was the founding of the Marxist-Leninist Communist Party of Greece (KKE) in 1918.
KKE’s early life was turbulent as it oscillated between underground action vs. suggestions to follow “full legitimacy” like the rest of the political parties. Internal dissension and “comradely conflict” helped turn KKE into a confused lump of bitter ideological rivals—Marxist/Leninists/Stalinists vs Trotskyites being the most prominent such conflict... Read more

warning9Q&A

Tassos Symeonides
(RIEAS Academic Advisor)

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (www.rieas.gr) Publication date: 20 October 2019

Note: The article reflects the opinion of the author and not necessarily the views of the Research Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS

What is the One Percent Factor in preparing to respond to threats and crises?

Planners attempt to create models that cover all bases. However, no model is ever 100 percent complete in its assumptions and proposed remedial actions—unpredictability is the bane of all planners irrespective of the subject at hand.

The One Percent Factor is a moniker to describe this unpredictable “dark part,” present in all estimates and plans, which policy makers assume is the most unlikely possibility they might have to face—and thus it could be assumed to rest on the very far improbable part of all possibilities. ...Read more

investment8Q & A
Tassos Symeonides
(RIEAS Academic Advisor)

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (www.rieas.gr) Publication date: 13 October 2019

Note: The article reflects the opinion of the author and not necessarily the views of the Research Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS

Ever since his electoral victory last July PM Mitsotakis misses no opportunity to extend invitations to foreign investors to bring their money to Greece. In view of the country’s severe complications after the 2010 default, and the lingering impact of EU-imposed austerity, what should be of concern to foreign investors who might be “thinking Greek?”
Investors in general seek environments with at least three key qualities: (a) A free market with minimum interference from governments (b) legal and tax stability, and (c) a reasonably trained and educated workforce. If these three variables can be reasonably guaranteed, plans for investment may go ahead. It is the juggling and risk-inclined type who would ignore misgivings about any of these three factors in making investment decisions; the rest of less risk-prone investors will stay away. ...Read more

aegeanmig9Tassos Symeonides
(RIEAS Academic Advisor)

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (www.rieas.gr) Publication date: 6 October 2019

Note: The article reflects the opinion of the author and not necessarily the views of the Research Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS

In recent weeks, Greece is experiencing a major resurgence of illegal alien arrivals replicating the worst moments of the 2015 mass invasion. The onslaught is well organized and timed. Human traffickers, operating along Turkey’s Aegean shores, often with the collaboration of Turkish authorities, have perfected their system of pushing the illegals across the narrows: the inflatables are shoved in the water in broad daylight, their passengers are well equipped with life preservers, and the “captains,” smugglers of various nationalities and carrying latest technology cellphones, steer directly and primarily to Lesbos, where NGO “receivers” are waiting (with their global reception cellphones at the ready) to immediately disembark the arrivals, make sure they discard their floaters, and point them to the interior of the island already ravaged and savaged by these incoming hordes...Read more

change1Q&A

Tassos Symeonides
(RIEAS Academic Advisor)

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (www.rieas.gr) Publication date: 29 September 2019

Note: The article reflects the opinion of the author and not necessarily the views of the Research Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS

We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light. The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men.
Plato

Greece has a new government that broadcasts encouraging signals on how the country will be soon a model EU state after years of sharp decline. How realistic are these pronouncements?

There is no government, in Greece or elsewhere, that will choose to bluntly tell voters the harsh truths, especially when this government has just come to power. The Mitsotakis administration is no exception to this rule. For the past two months, the tune is one of optimism and pro-active determination....Read more

challengesmitsA NEW BEGINNING -- OR IS IT?
Q & A

Τάσσος Συμεωνίδης
(RIEAS Academic Advisor)

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (www.rieas.gr) Publication date: 22 September 2019

Note: The article reflects the opinion of the author and not necessarily the views of the Research Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS

The newly elected Mitsotakis administration is gathering praise from foreign media, investor interest is increasing, and the EU appears willing to review the strictures put upon Greece via the bailout agreements now that a new government is broadcasting all the right signals. Furthermore, Greek public opinion seems upbeat for the first time in a decade. Are we experiencing a genuine new beginning or is there a question mark attached to all this?

Every new beginning has its ups and downs. As of this moment, PM Kyriakos Mitsotakis rides the crest of enthusiasm over the ejection of the radical leftists from power. But enthusiasm is a flitting phenomenon. The election result has not eliminated the many dire problems, created over the past 4- and 1/2-years, facing Greece. If anything, crises, like, for example, the yet again burgeoning invasion by “irregular” migrants, are here to stay for an indefinite time. Mitsotakis faces, first and foremost, the challenge of “managing” situations which, for all indents and purposes, appear (and, usually, are) unmanageable. He needs time and time he does not really have; Greek voters are exhausted after nearly five years of scandal upon scandal, horrendous mismanagement, and bone-crushing lies, and are thirsting for a breather. ..Read more

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