intelcultures9RIEAS presents the Book titled: Intelligence Communities and Cultures in Asia and the Middle East: A Comprehensive Reference by Bob de Graaff, editor, Professor of intelligence and security studies at the University of Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Description of the Book
How are intelligence systems structured in countries across Asia and the Middle East—from Russia to India, from Turkey to China and Japan, from Kazakhstan to Saudi Arabia? In what ways did decolonization and the Cold War influence their organization? What is their mission, and to what extent do they come under public scrutiny?

The authors of this comprehensive reference delve into these questions, and more, to provide a unique, systematic survey of intelligence practices and cultures in 22 countries. Read more

erik9RIEAS presents the book titled: “Intelligence Operations: Understanding Data, Tools, People, and Processes” helps readers understand the various issues and considerations an intelligence professional must tackle when reviewing, planning, and managing intelligence operations, regardless of level or environment.

The book opens by introducing the reader to the many defining concepts associated with intelligence, as well as the main subject of intelligence: the threat. Additional chapters examine the community of intelligence, revealing where intelligence is actually practiced, as well as what defines and characterizes intelligence operations. Readers learn about the four critical components to every intelligence operation—data, tools, people, and processes—and then explore the various operational and analytic processes involved in greater detail. Throughout, the text encourages discovery and discussion, urging readers to first understand the material, then break it down, adapt it, and apply it in a way that supports their particular operations or requirements.

Unique in approach and designed to assist professionals at all levels, Intelligence Operations is an excellent resource for both academic courses in the subject and practical application by intelligence personnel. Read more

patrickbook8In 2019, RIEAS presented a book titled on “Intelligence, Biosecurity and Bioterrorism” written by Patrick F. Walsh, a former intelligence analyst who has worked in Australia’s National Security and Law Enforcement. Dr. John M Nomikos met Mr. Patrick F. Walsh in an international conference in Europe. The second chapter of the book focuses on “The Biosecurity Threat Environment” (pages: 21 -57). On page 35, Mr. Patrick F. Walsh emphasizes on “Emerging Biosecurity Threats (2018-2023). The book is a “must” for any analyst, scholar who focuses his/her research on Biosecurity Threat Environment. His book explores how potential bio-threats and risks may evolve post 9/11 given the rapid changes in biotechnology and synthetic biology. It also explores what role intelligence communities can play in understanding threats and risks. It argues that although bio-threats and risks are largely low probability and high impact in nature, intelligence in ‘Five Eyes’ countries remain insufficiently prepared to understand them. This book identifies key areas where intelligence reforms need to take place including a more strategic and systematic collaboration between national security/law enforcement intelligence and the scientific community. It is aimed at intelligence analysts, those in the scientific community working on health security threats, policy makers and researchers working on biosecurity and bioterrorism threats and risks. Read more

keshav1RIEAS international Advisor Keshav Mazumdar Antiterrorism Officer CPO CAS CMAS FNWC ASC CRC has singlehandedly created a full Army/paramilitary intelligence architecture configured for low intensity conflict from Battalion to Brigade level on American Army lines.The system is under evaluation in India for Indian Security Forces operating in Kashmir and North East. Mr Mazumdar hold international credentials and is globally respected as an intelligence expert. Read more

National security affairs analyst Ehud Eilam examines the strategy of containment in the Middle East as it is currently pursued. For the United States, containment is a way to avoid war with Iran and thwart its nuclear weapons program. For Israel it has been a way to prevent a confrontation with the Palestinians in both the Gaza Strip and the West Bank. In other cases, containment is meant to weaken a foe without starting a war, as Israel did by bombing shipments of weapons to Hezbollah. Containment was also part of the war in Syria—because the West lacked the ability to overthrow Bashar al-Assad, though it cost the civilian population there dearly. Egypt has been trying to contain both its enormous economic hardships and ISIS, primarily in the Sinai Peninsula. Ultimately Eilam provides important and timely insights into the Middle East’s perennially fluid and volatile political environment. His insights and analyses will be of interest not least in the corridors of power both here and abroad. Read more

The Red Sea is one of the world’s most important trade routes, a theater of power struggle among local, regional and global powers. Military and political developments continue to impact on the geostrategic landscape of the region in the context of its trade thoroughfare for Europe, China, Japan and India; freedom of navigation is a strategic interest for Egypt, and essential for Israel’s economic ties with Asia. Read more

afghanistanintel9Globalisation continues to challenge our world at unprecedented speed. Technological innovations, changing geographical developments, regional rivalries, and destruction of national critical infrastructures in several Muslim states due to the US so called war on terrorism-all transformed the structures and hierarchies of societies. The idea of development of a nation that sounds on tripods that are food, shelter and security failed. The Edward Snowden leaks challenged policy makers and the public understanding. Read more

spywarsThe central intelligence agencies have earned the wrath of the government for failing to sufficiently warn local agencies. Why do our secret intelligence agencies fail repeatedly? Is it because of the lack of adequate intelligence, the dearth of trained manpower in the intelligence sector, failure to apply latest sophisticated technology in surveillance, lack of proper intelligence sharing between the Centre and the states, lack of action on available intelligence, or the lack of sensible intelligence reforms? Read more

strategicintelJohn A. Gentry and Joseph S. Gordon update our understanding of strategic warning intelligence analysis for the twenty-first century. Strategic warning—the process of long-range analysis to alert senior leaders to trending threats and opportunities that require action—is a critical intelligence function. It also is frequently misunderstood and underappreciated. Gentry and Gordon draw on both their practitioner and academic backgrounds to present a history of the strategic warning function in the US intelligence community. In doing so, they outline the capabilities of analytic methods, explain why strategic warning analysis is so hard, and discuss the special challenges strategic warning encounters from senior decision-makers. They also compare how strategic warning functions in other countries, evaluate why the United States has in recent years emphasized current intelligence instead of strategic warning, and recommend warning-related structural and procedural improvements in the US intelligence community. The authors examine historical case studies, including postmortems of warning failures, to provide examples of the analytic points they make. Strategic Warning Intelligence will interest scholars and practitioners and will be an ideal teaching text for intermediate and advanced students. Read more

davidkenyonSince the secret of Bletchley Park was revealed in the 1970s, the work of its codebreakers has become one of the most famous stories of the Second World War. But cracking the Nazis’ codes was only the start of the process. Thousands of secret intelligence workers were then involved in making crucial information available to the Allied leaders and commanders who desperately needed it.

Using previously classified documents, David Kenyon casts the work of Bletchley Park in a new light, as not just a codebreaking establishment, but as a fully developed intelligence agency. He shows how preparations for the war’s turning point—the Normandy Landings in 1944—had started at Bletchley years earlier, in 1942, with the careful collation of information extracted from enemy signals traffic. This account reveals the true character of Bletchley's vital contribution to success in Normandy, and ultimately, Allied victory.

David Kenyon is the research historian at Bletchley Park. He is coauthor of Digging the Trenches and author of Horsemen in No Man's Land. Read more

intelbook9Written from a practitioner’s perspective, Intelligence in Regulation fills a void in international literature on regulation. The wide and largely disparate world of regulators is late to the idea of professionalising decision-making despite this need being well understood and ingrained in national security and, to a lesser extent, law enforcement.

The book draws largely from the experience of the author as a former intelligence officer, as a builder of intelligence and decision-systems across many sectors, and as a user of intelligence in leading regulatory operations. The narrative leads the reader through the barriers to effective regulatory decision-making, then to case studies of regulatory failure, and concludes with practical guidance on building and improving intelligence systems. Theoretical references are drawn from a number of sources and, in particular, the book acts as a companion piece to Managing Intelligence: The Art of Influence (Quarmby and Young, 2010) which contains the fundamentals of contemporary intelligence craft.

While oriented towards compliance and regulation, the content can be applied across other public and private sectors, especially where consideration of external change agents is important in decision-making. If in doubt, simply insert the name of your organisation or field where you read the word ‘regulator’ and you may be surprised how many of the observations echo your own organisational circumstance. Read more

afghaniintelbookThe War on Terror has left Afghanistan without a viable centralized intelligence agency. Thousands of bloodstained and heartbreaking stories in newspapers, journals and books document the failures of the KHAD and NDS. The government and military are both crippled by the "bad intel" due to lack of mutual trust and limited information sharing. Read more

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