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newzealand89Q&A

Tassos Symeonides
(RIEAS Academic Advisor)

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (www.rieas.gr) Publication date: 31 March 2019

Note: The article reflects the opinion of the author and not necessarily the views of the Research Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS).

The horrific New Zealand mosque attack was yet another terrible escalation of international terrorism. What are we to expect in the wake of Christchurch?

The overwhelming revulsion at the death of so many innocent victims inevitably overshadowed a significant fact associated with this latest outrage: in view of the steady escalation of Islamist terrorist violence in recent years, it is not so much a surprise that Christchurch did happen but, rather, why such a barbarity took so long to occur in a global system where tit-for-tat and unbridled religious-induced violence have become the daily norms. Only those who ignore reality were unprepared for an attack like Christchurch. We can only speculate about the reasons behind this terrorist “time lapse” but the worrisome fact now is what to expect next. Islamist terrorism knows no bounds in its barbarity, brutality and appalling rejection of the sanctity of human life. It is only “rational” that as we speak Islamic “avengers” are planning an equally, or even worse, counterstroke against the infidels in the Christian world. Read more

syria2012Dr (Col.Res) Shaul
(Senior research fellow at the International Institute for Counter-Terrorism (ICT) at the Interdisciplinary Center Herzeliya (IDC) and former Deputy Head of Israel National Security Council)

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (www.rieas.gr) Publication date: 13 March 2019

Note: The article reflects the opinion of the author and not necessarily the views of the Research Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS).

Nearly eight years into the war in Syria, Assad's government forces supported by Russia , Iran and Hezbollah have regained control of the majority of Syria. As the war in Syria appears to wind down, there are many diplomatic efforts made by the Assad regime and Arab countries to normalize relations. Read more

grusa1A “new beginning?”

Q&A

Tassos Symeonides

(RIEAS Academic Advisor)

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (www.rieas.gr) Publication date: 3 March 2019

Note: The article reflects the opinion of the author and not necessarily the views of the Research Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS).

Last December we witnessed the inaugural US-Greece strategic dialogue meeting in Washington between Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo and then Greek Acting Minister of Foreign Affairs George Katrougalos. Is this truly a new beginning?

Greek-American relations are full of “new beginnings.” Diplomatic language, irrespective of the point in time, tends to stress the positive for obvious reasons. What lies behind such statements, however, is an altogether different matter. Perceptions from Athens and Washington vary: Greece, for instance, as the vastly weaker partner, seeks an American “umbrella” against the perennial Turkish threat; the US, on the other hand, focuses on a complex global and regional security scheme in which Greece is one of many pivots, an important one perhaps but, still, one of many...Read more

mesarabnatoDr (Col.Res) Shaul
(Senior research fellow at the International Institute for Counter-Terrorism (ICT) at the Interdisciplinary Center Herzeliya (IDC) and former Deputy Head of Israel National Security Council.

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (www.rieas.gr) Publication date: 24 February 2019

Note: The article reflects the opinion of the author and not necessarily the views of the Research Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS).

US President Donald Trump’s administration is pursuing plans to establish a new security and political framework with US regional allies. It will include all Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) states—Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE—as well as Egypt, Jordan, and the United States..Read more

rawphoto9Musa Khan Jalalzai
(Security Expert)

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (www.rieas.gr) Publication date: 17 February 2019.

Note: The article reflects the opinion of the author and not necessarily the views of the Research Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS).

Intelligence organizations of the twenty first century make outstretched distinction between operations, analysis, and functions. Field officers collect intelligence, analysts analyze information, and processors categorize it to help policy makers in designing military strategies. Any civilian or military government that wants to professionalize its intelligence infrastructure, and prevent it from decaying needs statecraft, which is comprised of economic power, and a strong military force and mature diplomacy. The case is quite different in India and Pakistan, where emerging contradictions in the state system, ethnic and sectarian divide, and failure of intelligence and internal security strategies generated a countrywide debate, in which experts deeply criticised the waste of financial resources by their intelligence agencies in an unnecessary proxy war in South Asia. Intelligence reform in India has been the most controversial issue as reform committees have been hijacked by political and bureaucratic stakeholders...Read more

corruptionchainGreece and corruption
Q&A

Τάσσος Συμεωνίδης
(RIEAS Academic Advisor)

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (www.rieas.gr)

Publication date: 10 February 2019

Note: The article reflects the opinion of the author and not necessarily the views of the Re-search Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS).

For as long as anyone can remember corruption has been at the center of the perennial Greek crisis of politics, society, and economic stability. Even after nearly ten years of unprecedented punishment by the EU “bailouts” Greece remains as corrupt as before. Is there anything that can be done to break this fatal deadlock?

Corruption, both private and public, enjoys such a long tradition and roots so deep that it would take a cataclysmic jolt to bring about even moderate change. Corruption is practically synonymous with Greek “government” and public “ethics.” Bankruptcy, and the disastrous “bailouts” that have turned Greece into a subject nation of limited sovereignty, has only made a bad situation infinitely worse....Read more

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